Skip to Content
library talk icon
LibraryTalk
close talk chat
Events management: an introduction

Events management: an introduction

Bladen, Charles, author; Abson, Emma, author; Kennell, James, author; Wilde, Nick, author

Contemporary events management is a diverse and challenging field. This introductory textbook explores the multi-disciplinary nature of events management and provides all the practical skills and professional knowledge students need to succeed in the events industry

Paperback, Book. English.
Second edition.
Published London: Routledge, 2018
Rate this

Available at London Library and St Peter's Library.

This item is not reservable because:

  • There are no reservable copies for this title. Please contact a member of library staff for further information.
  • London Library – One available - 394.2068/BLA

    Barcode Shelfmark Loan type Status
    11113271652 394.2068/BLA LC four week loan Available
  • St Peter's Library – Three available - 394.2068/B40

    Barcode Shelfmark Loan type Status
    11113252334 394.2068/B40 28 Day Loan Available
    11113252352 394.2068/B40 28 Day Loan Available
    11113173189 394.2068/B40 7 Day Loan Available
    11113252343 394.2068/B40 28 Day Loan Due back 30th June

Details

Statement of responsibility: Charles Bladen, James Kennell, Emma Abson and Nick Wilde
ISBN: 1138907057, 9781138907058
Intended audience: Specialized.
Note: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Note: Previous edition: 2012.
Physical Description: xxiii, 439 pages : illustrations (black and white, and colour) ; 25 cm
Subject: Special events Management.; Customs and Folklore.

Contents

  1. Endorsements
  2. List of images
  3. List of figures
  4. List of tables
  5. List of case studies
  6. Acknowledgements
  7. Guided Tour
  8. Introduction to events management
  9. Introduction to the second edition
  10. Aims of the second edition
  11. What is an event?
  12. Events Management Challenges
  13. Events, human history and culture
  14. The events "business"
  15. Role of Events' Managers
  16. Events profession and education
  17. About this book
  18. Industry Voice
  19. Summary
  20. Further reading
  21. 2 Managing event projects
  22. 2.1 Aims
  23. 2.2 Introduction
  24. 2.3 Events as projects
  25. 2.4 Project management perspectives
  26. 2.5 Event project definition, organisation and framework
  27. 2.6 Project parameters
  28. 2.7 Stakeholder requirements and needs
  29. 2.8 The project objective statement
  30. 2.9 Project planning
  31. 2.10 Project optimisation
  32. 2.11 Project evaluation and review techniques
  33. 2.12 Project crashing
  34. 2.13 Project risk management
  35. 2.14 Project cost breakdown structures
  36. 2.15 Project implementation
  37. 2.16 Project shut-down
  38. 2.17 The required competences of an event project leader
  39. Industry voice
  40. 2.19 Summary
  41. Further reading
  42. 3 Event design and production
  43. 3.1 Aims
  44. 3.2 Introduction
  45. 3.3 Recent Developments
  46. 3.4 Events as designed experiences
  47. 3.5 Concept and theme
  48. 3.6 Understanding Event Experiences
  49. 3.7 Event staging and logistics
  50. Industry Voice
  51. 3.8 Summary
  52. Further Reading
  53. 4 Event operations
  54. 4.1 Aims
  55. 4.2 Introduction
  56. 4.3 The legal environment
  57. 4.4 Insurance
  58. 4.5 Regulations, licences and permits
  59. 4.6 Events contracts
  60. 4.7 Event logistics
  61. Industry voice
  62. 4.8 Summary
  63. Further reading
  64. 5 Managing the event human resource
  65. 5.1 Aims
  66. 5.2 Introduction
  67. 5.3 The event human resource challenge
  68. 5.4 Finding the right people
  69. 5.5 The challenges in practice to the events industry
  70. 5.6 Formulating and conducting event induction and acculturation
  71. 5.7 Developing effective communication with event workers
  72. 5.8 Event employee learning and development
  73. 5.9 Motivating, maximising performance and retaining employees
  74. 5.10 Remunerating staff
  75. Industry voice
  76. 5.11 Summary
  77. Further reading
  78. 6 Event finance
  79. Robert Wilson, Sheffield Hallam University, UK
  80. Aims
  81. Introduction
  82. Financial Terminology
  83. Financial Planning and Control
  84. Users of Event Finance Information
  85. Budgeting and Events
  86. Budgeting as a logically sequenced planning process
  87. Common methods of budgeting
  88. Applying budgeting to worked examples
  89. Comparing actual and budgeted performance
  90. Summary
  91. Further reading
  92. 7 Event marketing
  93. 7.1 Aims
  94. 7.2 Introduction
  95. 7.3 Event marketing planning
  96. 7.4 Event sponsorship
  97. Industry voice
  98. 7.5 Summary
  99. Further reading
  100. 8 Event health, safety and risk management
  101. 8.1 Aims
  102. 8.2 Introduction
  103. 8.3 Health and safety legislation
  104. 8.4 Health and safety management
  105. 8.5 Risk management
  106. 8.6 Risk assessment
  107. 8.7 Specific event risks
  108. Industry voice
  109. 8.8 Summary
  110. Further reading
  111. 9 Sporting events
  112. 9.1 Aims
  113. 9.2 Introduction
  114. 9.3 Overview of the sports industry
  115. 9.4 Managing the sporting event: managing participants
  116. 9.5 Sporting events marketing
  117. Industry voice
  118. 9.6 Summary
  119. Further reading
  120. 10 Mega-events
  121. 10.1 Aims
  122. 10.2 Introduction
  123. 10.3 Defining mega-events
  124. 10.4 Mega-event periods
  125. 10.5 Mega-event tourism
  126. Industry voice
  127. 10.6 Summary
  128. Further reading
  129. 11 Events in the public and third sectors
  130. 11.1 Aims
  131. 11.2 Introduction
  132. 11.3 The public sector
  133. 11.4 Events in the public sector
  134. 11.5 The third sector
  135. 11.6 Events in the third sector
  136. 11.7 Other not-for-profit events
  137. Industry voice
  138. 11.8 Summary
  139. Further reading
  140. 12 Corporate events
  141. 12.1 Aims
  142. 12.2 Introduction
  143. 12.3 Categorisation
  144. 12.4 Key logistical issues for corporate events
  145. 12.5 The corporate event customer
  146. 12.6 Corporate event evaluation
  147. Industry voice
  148. 12.7 Summary
  149. Further reading
  150. 13 Cultural events and festivals
  151. 13.1 Aims
  152. 13.2 Introduction
  153. 13.3 Cultural events
  154. 13.4 Festivals
  155. 13.5 Types of cultural events and festivals
  156. 13.6 Programming cultural events and festivals
  157. 13.7 Marketing cultural events and festivals
  158. 13.8 The public role of cultural events and festivals
  159. Industry voice
  160. 13.9 Summary
  161. Further reading
  162. 14 Event impacts, sustainability and legacy
  163. 14.1 Aims
  164. 14.2 Introduction
  165. 14.3 Event impacts
  166. 14.4 Measuring impacts and evaluating events
  167. 14.5 Event sustainability
  168. 14.6 Event legacies
  169. 14.7 Events and the new economics
  170. Industry voice
  171. 14.8 Summary
  172. Further reading
  173. 15 Events and the media
  174. 15.1 Aims
  175. 15.2 Introduction
  176. 15.3 What is the media?
  177. 15.4 The role of the media in events management
  178. 15.5 The media and links to stakeholders
  179. 15.6 Media management
  180. 15.7 The impact of media coverage on events
  181. 15.8 Crisis management for event managers
  182. Industry voice
  183. 15.9 Summary
  184. Further reading
  185. References
  186. Index